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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 654 (some duplicates have been removed)
of libya. >>> on the border. a rare look at the daily game of cat and mouse that the u.s. is fighting against drug smugglers. >>> "america at the crossroads." tonight why america's losing some of the best and brightest and how to keep them here. >>> and tired of it all. alarming news about a problem that impairs our economy, our health, our jobs, actually puts us in danger. health, our jobs, actually puts us in danger. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the president of the united states is now on record. the longtime libyan leader needs to leave and change must now come to libya. this is how the president put it at the white house today. >> let me just be very unambiguous about this. colonel gadhafi needs to step down from power and leave. that is good for his country. it is good for his people. it's the right thing to do. >> of course, that brings us to the question about how to do that, how to finish what the libyan uprising has started. there's growing support for a so-called no-fly zone, but the defense secretary continues t
command will likely look like when the u.s. transitions to what will be essentially a nato, plus arab countries. h isep model used in afghanistan as it's described to me. we understand the u.s. and france have come to a late agree in the the last few hours there is now no discrepancy between what france wants and what the u.s. wants. the president we understand is culting short his visit to latin america. he plans to transition. i'm told we can expect a transition of command by this time next week. the headquarters likely to be at a nato headquarters in naples, italy. the f-15 fighter jet went down at 11:33 monday evening local time according to u.s. marine officials. the two airmen ejected safely after an apparent malfunction of the jet. other pilots in the air at the time say they did not see enemy fire. seven u.s. military aircraft were launched from their bases in the mediterranean to take part in the recovery. two u.s. carrier jets flew cover for the mission and defense officials confirmed dropped two bomb to separate the pilot from suspected enemy approach. the downed pilot was
assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
>>> on the broadcast tonight, who's in charge? is the u.s. about to hand over control of the attack on libya? and tonight what may be the next nation to go in that region. >>> changing face. a major milestone tonight for a growing group of americans. >>> asleep in the tower. two jets needing to land in washington can't raise an air traffic controller, and now we know why. >>> and making a difference, for the struggling people of japan. nbc news with americans on a mission to provide critical relief. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it has turned into a big military effort, bombs and cruise missiles have been raining down on libya, and it could get even bigger and the stakes are high. it's been a mostly u.s. run air campaign thus far, but tonight a change is coming. a hand-over to nato for the supervision of this strike. even though the pentagon warned libya today, quote, we will continue to hit you, the u.s. is anxious to shift some of this to somebody else. and just as there have been new and loud explosions in tripoli this
of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertainty leading to more evacuation of locate from the immediate exclusion zone as well as from sendai the biggest city near the reactor complex. another evacuation center locals grumble over the perceived mishandling of t
. this morning, target libya. u.s. and european forces pound libya overnight. taking out key targets at the u.s. gets embroiled in a new overseas conflict. now moammar gadhafi is surrounding key sites with women and children to create a human shield. how involved will the u.s. get? >>> hope and fear. nine days after the tsunami, an incredible rescue. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy found alive. but then, there's this. the drinking water in tokyo, now tainted with radiation. >>> fall from grace. he was the most famous bear in the world. knut the polar bear has died at the young age of 4. how did he go from the top of the world to this tragic end? >>> and bullied no more. this is the video giving hope to underdogs all over the world. this boy body-slams his bully. this morning, he's telling his story. what made him snap? >>> good morning. the u.s. is now involved in its third overseas conflict. this one is called operation odyssey dawn. and throughout the night, we saw images like these. u.s. and british ships and submarines launches missiles at libyan targets to establish a no-fly zone ov
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
. what will the u.s. do in those countries, if anything? plus, does the united states have a responsibility to intervene in the humanitarian crisis that was this woman trashing a liquor store when she did not receive prompt attention from a clerk? we'll discuss. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> american military officials are claiming initial success in isolating moammar gadhafi's regime, after a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according tocy officials, coalition strikes have crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no fly zone is in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, at least not now. one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's compound in tripoli last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown, but he has vowed to fight a quote long, drawn-out war with western forces. >>> meanwhile, the pentagon says there is so far no evidence that civilians in libya have been harmed in the conflict, although it w
-made guns across the border and for the unrelenting demand of illegal drugs in the u.s. the two countries are also at odds after a wikileaks release quoting u.s. officials quoting mexican's security agencies "corrupt and dysfunctional." publicly, the obama administration is putting a positive spin on the relationship. >> there exists an unprecedented level of cooperation between the u.s. and mexico. >> but when the two presidents go behind bars, tensions could rise over a recent interview in which president calderon called u.s. law enforcement agencies disorganized. and there will also be discussions about the growing number of americans caught in the cross fire of mexico's drug war, including u.s. immigration agent, jaime spatta, who was killed in an ambush along a highway 16 days ago. at his funeral last week, homeland department secretary, janet napolitano, promised to seek justice. >> we will not relent or let up or flinch in any way in our determination to see that those responsible for his death are held to account for their crimes. >> mexico is the u.s.'s largest trade partner, and
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
in their 60s. a neighbor tells fox5 they are iranian nationals who are permanent residents of the u.s. the couple left for iran several weeks ago for the end engagement of one of their two daughters. investigators say they have been in touch with the owners who say they have no idea who would want to harm them or their property. they reported no recent threats or trouble of any kind. >> until we know what it is i will be a little bit nervous about what is going on here. >> reporter: this is where the bomb went off. plywood now covers the window. we are told that it is actually is the window that would ajoin a sitting room at the very front of the house. again, they are saying that the captured a lot of this on surveillance camera but stopped short of saying they actually captured the person placing the bomb on the window sile. the damage is fairly significant. we are told it is 25,000 to 50,000 dollars worth of damage here, sean. >> thank goodness no one got hurt. paul wagner, thanks. >> the reward is growing tonight in a bethesda murder mystery and also growing the memorial outside t
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
the president's plan. >>> fallout fears. the pentagon considers the mandatory evacuation of all u.s. military personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regi
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
to the airport there. he is going to join us for the very latest. again two u.s. service members among those who were killed and injured in an attack there at the airport in germany. we will bring that to you in just a short time. also we want to bring you up to date on fast moving developments. the libyan military has dropped three bombs and you see it on the map, brega. the opposition may control the town managing to drive out libyan troops. that's not the only place to see military action there. military camps on the outskirts. first we want to tell you about an aerial bombing has led some to propose the united states consider imposing a no-fly zone over the country. but the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said he called this a complex operation. one of those is a uss -- you are looking here at a photo of the ship from today as it went through the canal. near the region. secretary of defense, robert gates has said the repositioning is to provide humanitarian relief and the capen't for emergency evaguations. let me tell you about the capabilities. it has the ability to transport troops,
. radiation levels prompting the u.s. military to consider mandatory evacuation of thousands of american troops and their families in japan. radioactive dust being detected at very low levels, we want to point out in seattle, washington. despite substantial progress over the weekend this is far from over. we're going to have the latest details at this hour, also the latest on the dead and missing now numbering 21,000. and the body of a young american teacher has been found. we talked about her on this show last week, her parents had been searching for her. she's the first known american fatality. we begin though with the attack on gadhafi forces in libya, now entering day four. allied forces launching as many as 80 missions today, that is up from yesterday. americans flying fewer than half of them, that is down from yesterday. according to mission commander, pro-gadhafi forces are mounting little resistance, nor is the opposition taking advantage of air strikes on pro-gadhafi missions. while grateful for the air support, they're having trouble getting organized and have little communicat
to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. the pentagon says the u.s.-led air assault on libya has been very effective, inflicting heavy damage on government forces. the air strikes included over 120 cruise missiles, bt bombers and jet fighters. one of moammar gadhafi's compounds in tripoli was hit. but u.s. officials say gadhafi is not a target. the libyan dictator promises a long, hard war. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning to you. >> hi, good morning, terrell. after a weekend of heavy air strikes on libya, the main issue in washington is, where to go from here. u.s. officials are now planning a more limited role for u.s. forces going forward. u.s. officials are not planning to lead the mission in libya much longer. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. >> reporter: following a weekend of missile strikes and air patrols, defense secretary robert gates said the pentagon will soon hand over the reins to either the french and british, or to nato. his comments came as american
are overwhelmed. supplies are limited. plus, the u.s. military is moving in the region. the defense second robert gates now directioning two navy warships into the mediterranean. >>> and a dramatic new development in the race for 2012. the first major republican contender is ready to take a critical step towards announcing a run for president. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." let's begin with the latest developments in the libyan crisis. reports of gunfire and assault in the city of zawiya. that's where forces loyal to the libyan leader moammar gadhafi attempted but allegedly failed to seize control from rebels. meanwhile, a strong show of force against gadhafi just out of the united nations. the general assembly adopting a resolution to oust libya from the u.n. human rights council. we're monitoring the story from every angle on the ground as only the global resources of cnn can. first, let's go to tripoli where gadhafi shows no signs of losing his grip on power in the capital. some residents there have refrained from protesting for fear of simply being killed. cnn's senior inte
, and other u.s. officials and more pressure today from john mccain about what the military options might be. mccain now joining john kerry and others, calling for a no-fly zone and pushback from the pentagon, despite denials, i know, that the pentagon spokesman was on your show earlier at 9:00, saying that there has been no pushback. but certainly, what we've seen from secretary gates and the chairman of the joint chiefs, admiral mullen, is emphasizing all of the drawbacks to getting involved militarily there. chuck? >> well, you laid it out very well there, andrea. secretary gates yesterday, in referring to the no-fly -- the talk about the no-fly zone as loose talk certainly created the impression that there was somehow a little bit of a disconnect between the state department and the pentagon, about what is next, how serious is this idea for a no-fly done. so clearly, that's one of the questions that's going to be directed at the president later today. now, let's be careful, by the way, not to call this a press conference. they are only saying one question, for, quote, each side. >> one!
, can you talk a little bit about as a result of their trip last week, what adjustments you feel the u.s. military needs to be making right now and needs to be working on because of the changes and events in terms of the u.s. oteri relationship with any of these countries? secretary gates, a baker advice on that as well. >> i'm not sure about some significant adjustments right away. i think it's really important to stay engaged with them and as i said listen to what their concerns are. they actually want us to stay with them milks the mill. i want to see, you know, the assistance immediately cut off. they won a chance in their own countries to work on this kind of change specifically. i've engaged my counterparts a number of time. they greatly appreciate the relationship and are working their way through it and they appreciate the support. it is really for them to work for this and they want to sustain the relationship. we may have to adjusted over time, but they're certainly not calling for any significant change right now. >> i would say can i just pick up on the chairman's point. i th
, quote, in the very near future about the u.s. role going forward. the government met with the african union to hammer out a solution. there's violence in other areas of the region as well. in jordan, the associated press reports more than 100 people injured. clashes in ahman were the most i violent in that country in two months of protest. in bahrain, security forces fired tear gas and pellets at anti-government protests. thousands defied a ban on gathering followi ining prayers. and in yemen, the leader says h he's ready to step down, but only if he can leave the government in safe hands. gadhafi is now negotiating. the leaders of tunisia and egypt are already gone. yemen is on the verge of being knocked out, as you heard. these long-running dictatorships are on the ropes. why? because history is changing before our very eyes. there used to be a time when barberism and conquest was par for the course. it was what was expected. the mongols once wiped out a town and destroyed every building, but they also diverted a river that ran through the town. you want to know why? they wanted to
of this earthquake. it's not just the u.s., this is worldwide, because, as i said, japan is a very, very important economy. look at the japanese stock market. the nikkei, second day in a row of heavy losses. down 10.6% overnight. what typically happens, it starts in the east and moves west. hong kong, down only about 3%, though on a normal day, that's a big drop in the stock market. frankfurt, the dax, down 3.4%. the cac 40 in paris, down 2.3%. london's ftse 100, 1.3. you can see as we kent west, things started to calm down on markets. the bottom line in the united states is that japan is -- it's a big trading partner, but not as crucial as a lot of other countries like china, for instance. one of the things you'll see in the united states there will be some effect on supplies of electronics, technology equipment, computers and automobiles. the biggest export that japan has to the u.s. is automobiles. and a lot of them are auto parts. that's where you will see some of the biggest effect. as for japan itself, typically after a big disaster, you see some economic slowdown, then a build up because of
council resolution 1973. u.s. and british forces launched 12 tomahawk land attack missiles, targeting command-and-control facilities service to skirt -- a scud facility and a re-attack of the previous air site. forces from france, spain, italy, denmark, and united kingdom, with missions to sustain a no-fly zone in benghazi, to protect civilians from attack, and conduct further reconnaissance. coalition naval vessels sustained maritime controls toward u.n. security council resolution, to prevent the illegal shipments of arms to and from libya. iss our actions are generally achieving the intended objections. we have not observed a libyan military aircraft operating since the beginning of operations. the naval vessels have returned to or remain in port. cents initial strikes, no regime long range air defense radars. air attacks have succeeded in stopping regime ground forces from advancing to benghazi and we are now seeing ground forces moving southward from benghazi. we will, of course, watch these ground force movements closely. through a variety of reports, we know regime ground force
values. he argued last night that the u.s.-led coalition helped to avert a massacre that would have "stained the contents of the world." the alliance against gaddafi has made significant gains. rebels have recaptured nearly all the ground they lost and are closing in on the home town of gaddafi. the president emphasized that these gains have come at a relatively low-cost. the u.s. has not gone into this along. so the progress has come without u.s. ground troops and with a full transfer of power to nato tomorrow. the president stopped short of supporting a forceful removal of adopted, which has become a point of contention with republicans. >> now we are fighting on the side of the anti-gaddafi rebels. we are paving the way for them. we should acknowledge that. >> the president has found himself all along caught between those saying that he has not done enough and those that have said he has done too much. hillary clinton is in london today with international leaders to explore other options such as financial. >>> the situation at the crippled japanese nuclear power plant is being de
. >>> over to you. the u.s., it's giving up the lead in libya in a matter of days. one problem -- so far, there's no one to hand command to. can the u.s. get allies organized on the president's timeline? >>> japan's radiation fears. a run on water and basic supplies in tokyo and at the crippled nuclear plant, workers sent to the hospital from exposure to beta rays. >>> and washington, we have a problem. the strange case of two ssenger jets forc to lan on ei oat d.c. mor rpt when no one answered at air traffic control. we'll have the latest on the investigation, just ahead. >>> good morning, everyone. it's thursday, march 24th, 2011. i'm savannah guthrie. chuck todd will be back tomorrow. also this morning, the president getting it from the right and the left in congress on libya, as he wakes up this morning back in washington. and we will talk to the libyan ambassador to the u.s., who left the gadhafi regime live here on "the daily rundown" later this hour. >>> also, the slow start to the 2012 republican race seems to be helping one candidate -- president obama. we'll have the latest pol
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
the no- fly zone. u.s. and coalition fighter jets. at least another dozen cruise missiles. the mission is to keep moammar gadhafi's fighters from fighting. >> reporter: coalition planes are working to extend the no- fly zone. and the u.s. army general in charge says the strategy is working. >> we are so far achieving our military objectives, consistent with our mission. >> reporter: coalition forces are keeping up the assault on moammar gadhafi's offenses. they launched at least 12 more missile attacks monday, after a weekend of fighting. they even fired a missile at part of gadhafi's presidential compound. u.s. officials say he was using the building as a command center. >> and there is also a command facility that we are certain is a command and control facility. and that is the facility that was attacked. >> reporter: the goal of the mission is to take away gadhafi's ability to attack civilians and to establish a no- fly zone, while americans are leading the operations now, the u.s. is eager to hand over control to other nations. >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a m
's decision in libya and what role the u.s. has welcome to "washington journal" this friday, march 25. in "the baltimore sun," -- nato to take the lead. what do you think about the nato and u.s. role in libya? the numbers to call -- send us your tweets and we will read them. coverage of the nato-u.s. relationship in libya. allied forces hit a libyan jet that ventured into the air. taking a look at "the washington post" coverage. they are starting out with "obama pressed for clarity over libya." coming from both parties in congress, as well as others, to get some sense of where the u.s. is going with this. let's get to the phones and hear what you think. lydia in maryland. democrats' line. caller: i think it is great he is turning over command of the no-fly zone to nato. he said the united states would not be in the lead and it is about time it takes responsibility. more of the gulf states are contributing airplanes to the no-fly zone. i saw last night that night thatqatar, united arab emirates, contributing planes to the no- fly zone. that is great. they can do that. since the united states do
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 654 (some duplicates have been removed)